Nathan R. Jessup

Posts Tagged ‘racism’

Shocker: ‘Black’ Barbie Is Oppressed

In America, funny, Obama, Socialism on March 12, 2010 at 5:16 pm

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(By Joanne Galloway)

This video from Zonation quite succinctly explains EXACTLY why we see backlash like “Black Barbie is less than White Barbie” in today’s PC society.

I found this article on ABC news last week, and just had to shake my head.

Black Barbie selling for less than White Barbie.  It’s a polarizing subject that I am sure the likes of Reverend Jackson could pontificate about for hours.  In kind, most American’s could easily step in with valid opinions for varying reasons.

In the article, the experts consulted all suggested that smart retail business was tantamount to the devaluation of black girls.  I think it’s a stretch personally, but I believe the opinions contained within the article outline the core of the real problem – that our aim is off.  Blaming WalMart, or the dolls features for social “injustice” is just a reopening of old wounds – outlining separation of black and whites – ad nauseum.

For example:

Lisa Wade, an assistant sociology professor at Occidental College in Los Angeles had this to say, “Walmart could have decided “that it’s really important that we as a company don’t send a message that we value blackness less than whiteness,”.  She went on to say,  “Walmart could have chosen to keep the dolls at equal prices in an effort not to “reproduce whatever ugly inequalities are out there.”

Reproducing ugly inequalities indeed – that’s the core of it.  That’s where our sites should be aimed – at stopping this “reproduction” at all costs.

Other key points of view from the Barbie Color controversy noted:

“Black children develop perceptions about their race very early. They are not oblivious to this. There’s still that residue. There’s still the problem, the overcoming years, decades of racial and economic subordination,” Harvard University professor William Julius Wilson

-and-

“The implication of the lowering of the price is that’s devaluing the black doll,” said Thelma Dye, the executive director of the Northside Center for Child Development.

Walmart’s position was back to those nutty capitalistic retailer ideas:

“Pricing like items differently is a part of inventory management in retailing,” WalMart spokesperson Melissa O’Brien said.

Ok, maybe they all have a point, and maybe you agree or don’t.  But the pink elephant in the room went without mention, once again.

Residue. Reproduction of ugly inequalities. I don’t believe the actions of a retailer selling black dolls at “sale” prices is harming the socioeconomic fiber of black children in the US – I submit that it’s rather black leaders, schools, and government that do this.

Black leaders spew diatribes at the black community, telling them how they have been and  are being oppressed, and being treated unfairly in all social and economic situations.  The black community are constantly reminded of their unfortunate history in the US, and not of any strides and outright changes made since the early 60’s.  Why are black people always portrayed by their own leaders as an exclusionary group, and not what they are – American citizens – PART OF the whole, not just “apart” from the whole?

Educators use black history month to drive this exclusionary mantra home. I am certainly not saying that history of the Civil Rights movement is not important – I am merely suggesting that we start calling it American History and to stop constantly pointing out the differences – constantly indoctrinating our youth that black people are different – so different that black history be separate from the rest of America’s history.  Martin Luther King wanted black and whites sitting together – it wasn’t Mr. King’s idea to constantly have a separateness – his was a message of unification.

Indeed our US Government, as a never-ending apologetic reparations program has instituted programs further carving out a separateness of race, and not a kinship of mankind, such as  Affirmative Action.  Now before you go crazy – I understand why and how programs such as these, began– but what are they telling us now?  It is like we as a nation are saying to the black youths of America that they aren’t able to qualify among the regular workforce, so we’ll give you a leg up.  What’s the message here?  Blacks aren’t as smart as other races?  That blacks can’t compete unless the bets are hedged, that they can’t compete unless the deck’s been stacked in their favor?  That giving black people a head start is the only way they can be equal with other nationalities?  Even the PC term African-American is once again carving out a separateness of station.  As if they must be hyphenated, or qualified in some way – just to make especially careful we redefine the differences over and over.  Why not just be American?

If there is any message in the “Baribies” – it’s that it’s time to “sight in” our focus so that we’re aiming at the real problem here, and not continuing on the blame of our misguided past.  We don’t need Black History month – we need a refocus on how black people are part of America’s history.  Togetherness not separatist.   We don’t need a separate section in the bookstore for black writers, or black literature – isn’t this exactly the OPPOSITE of what Dr. King wanted?  Isn’t that just more segregation?  Why not count the black authors among the white – standing side by side, and shoulder to shoulder – and not given preferential treatment, or segregated treatment, but a togetherness.  A kinship.  A sense of oneness.

We need to stop outlining our differences and concentrate on what makes us the same – let’s let Barbie be Barbie, and retailers make sense of business – and leave the residue out of it.

Shocker: 'Black' Barbie Is Oppressed

In America, funny, Obama, Socialism on March 12, 2010 at 5:16 pm

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

(By Joanne Galloway)

This video from Zonation quite succinctly explains EXACTLY why we see backlash like “Black Barbie is less than White Barbie” in today’s PC society.

I found this article on ABC news last week, and just had to shake my head.

Black Barbie selling for less than White Barbie.  It’s a polarizing subject that I am sure the likes of Reverend Jackson could pontificate about for hours.  In kind, most American’s could easily step in with valid opinions for varying reasons.

In the article, the experts consulted all suggested that smart retail business was tantamount to the devaluation of black girls.  I think it’s a stretch personally, but I believe the opinions contained within the article outline the core of the real problem – that our aim is off.  Blaming WalMart, or the dolls features for social “injustice” is just a reopening of old wounds – outlining separation of black and whites – ad nauseum.

For example:

Lisa Wade, an assistant sociology professor at Occidental College in Los Angeles had this to say, “Walmart could have decided “that it’s really important that we as a company don’t send a message that we value blackness less than whiteness,”.  She went on to say,  “Walmart could have chosen to keep the dolls at equal prices in an effort not to “reproduce whatever ugly inequalities are out there.”

Reproducing ugly inequalities indeed – that’s the core of it.  That’s where our sites should be aimed – at stopping this “reproduction” at all costs.

Other key points of view from the Barbie Color controversy noted:

“Black children develop perceptions about their race very early. They are not oblivious to this. There’s still that residue. There’s still the problem, the overcoming years, decades of racial and economic subordination,” Harvard University professor William Julius Wilson

-and-

“The implication of the lowering of the price is that’s devaluing the black doll,” said Thelma Dye, the executive director of the Northside Center for Child Development.

Walmart’s position was back to those nutty capitalistic retailer ideas:

“Pricing like items differently is a part of inventory management in retailing,” WalMart spokesperson Melissa O’Brien said.

Ok, maybe they all have a point, and maybe you agree or don’t.  But the pink elephant in the room went without mention, once again.

Residue. Reproduction of ugly inequalities. I don’t believe the actions of a retailer selling black dolls at “sale” prices is harming the socioeconomic fiber of black children in the US – I submit that it’s rather black leaders, schools, and government that do this.

Black leaders spew diatribes at the black community, telling them how they have been and  are being oppressed, and being treated unfairly in all social and economic situations.  The black community are constantly reminded of their unfortunate history in the US, and not of any strides and outright changes made since the early 60’s.  Why are black people always portrayed by their own leaders as an exclusionary group, and not what they are – American citizens – PART OF the whole, not just “apart” from the whole?

Educators use black history month to drive this exclusionary mantra home. I am certainly not saying that history of the Civil Rights movement is not important – I am merely suggesting that we start calling it American History and to stop constantly pointing out the differences – constantly indoctrinating our youth that black people are different – so different that black history be separate from the rest of America’s history.  Martin Luther King wanted black and whites sitting together – it wasn’t Mr. King’s idea to constantly have a separateness – his was a message of unification.

Indeed our US Government, as a never-ending apologetic reparations program has instituted programs further carving out a separateness of race, and not a kinship of mankind, such as  Affirmative Action.  Now before you go crazy – I understand why and how programs such as these, began– but what are they telling us now?  It is like we as a nation are saying to the black youths of America that they aren’t able to qualify among the regular workforce, so we’ll give you a leg up.  What’s the message here?  Blacks aren’t as smart as other races?  That blacks can’t compete unless the bets are hedged, that they can’t compete unless the deck’s been stacked in their favor?  That giving black people a head start is the only way they can be equal with other nationalities?  Even the PC term African-American is once again carving out a separateness of station.  As if they must be hyphenated, or qualified in some way – just to make especially careful we redefine the differences over and over.  Why not just be American?

If there is any message in the “Baribies” – it’s that it’s time to “sight in” our focus so that we’re aiming at the real problem here, and not continuing on the blame of our misguided past.  We don’t need Black History month – we need a refocus on how black people are part of America’s history.  Togetherness not separatist.   We don’t need a separate section in the bookstore for black writers, or black literature – isn’t this exactly the OPPOSITE of what Dr. King wanted?  Isn’t that just more segregation?  Why not count the black authors among the white – standing side by side, and shoulder to shoulder – and not given preferential treatment, or segregated treatment, but a togetherness.  A kinship.  A sense of oneness.

We need to stop outlining our differences and concentrate on what makes us the same – let’s let Barbie be Barbie, and retailers make sense of business – and leave the residue out of it.

Shocker: 'Black' Barbie Is Oppressed

In America, funny, Obama, Socialism on March 12, 2010 at 5:16 pm

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

(By Joanne Galloway)

This video from Zonation quite succinctly explains EXACTLY why we see backlash like “Black Barbie is less than White Barbie” in today’s PC society.

I found this article on ABC news last week, and just had to shake my head.

Black Barbie selling for less than White Barbie.  It’s a polarizing subject that I am sure the likes of Reverend Jackson could pontificate about for hours.  In kind, most American’s could easily step in with valid opinions for varying reasons.

In the article, the experts consulted all suggested that smart retail business was tantamount to the devaluation of black girls.  I think it’s a stretch personally, but I believe the opinions contained within the article outline the core of the real problem – that our aim is off.  Blaming WalMart, or the dolls features for social “injustice” is just a reopening of old wounds – outlining separation of black and whites – ad nauseum.

For example:

Lisa Wade, an assistant sociology professor at Occidental College in Los Angeles had this to say, “Walmart could have decided “that it’s really important that we as a company don’t send a message that we value blackness less than whiteness,”.  She went on to say,  “Walmart could have chosen to keep the dolls at equal prices in an effort not to “reproduce whatever ugly inequalities are out there.”

Reproducing ugly inequalities indeed – that’s the core of it.  That’s where our sites should be aimed – at stopping this “reproduction” at all costs.

Other key points of view from the Barbie Color controversy noted:

“Black children develop perceptions about their race very early. They are not oblivious to this. There’s still that residue. There’s still the problem, the overcoming years, decades of racial and economic subordination,” Harvard University professor William Julius Wilson

-and-

“The implication of the lowering of the price is that’s devaluing the black doll,” said Thelma Dye, the executive director of the Northside Center for Child Development.

Walmart’s position was back to those nutty capitalistic retailer ideas:

“Pricing like items differently is a part of inventory management in retailing,” WalMart spokesperson Melissa O’Brien said.

Ok, maybe they all have a point, and maybe you agree or don’t.  But the pink elephant in the room went without mention, once again.

Residue. Reproduction of ugly inequalities. I don’t believe the actions of a retailer selling black dolls at “sale” prices is harming the socioeconomic fiber of black children in the US – I submit that it’s rather black leaders, schools, and government that do this.

Black leaders spew diatribes at the black community, telling them how they have been and  are being oppressed, and being treated unfairly in all social and economic situations.  The black community are constantly reminded of their unfortunate history in the US, and not of any strides and outright changes made since the early 60’s.  Why are black people always portrayed by their own leaders as an exclusionary group, and not what they are – American citizens – PART OF the whole, not just “apart” from the whole?

Educators use black history month to drive this exclusionary mantra home. I am certainly not saying that history of the Civil Rights movement is not important – I am merely suggesting that we start calling it American History and to stop constantly pointing out the differences – constantly indoctrinating our youth that black people are different – so different that black history be separate from the rest of America’s history.  Martin Luther King wanted black and whites sitting together – it wasn’t Mr. King’s idea to constantly have a separateness – his was a message of unification.

Indeed our US Government, as a never-ending apologetic reparations program has instituted programs further carving out a separateness of race, and not a kinship of mankind, such as  Affirmative Action.  Now before you go crazy – I understand why and how programs such as these, began– but what are they telling us now?  It is like we as a nation are saying to the black youths of America that they aren’t able to qualify among the regular workforce, so we’ll give you a leg up.  What’s the message here?  Blacks aren’t as smart as other races?  That blacks can’t compete unless the bets are hedged, that they can’t compete unless the deck’s been stacked in their favor?  That giving black people a head start is the only way they can be equal with other nationalities?  Even the PC term African-American is once again carving out a separateness of station.  As if they must be hyphenated, or qualified in some way – just to make especially careful we redefine the differences over and over.  Why not just be American?

If there is any message in the “Baribies” – it’s that it’s time to “sight in” our focus so that we’re aiming at the real problem here, and not continuing on the blame of our misguided past.  We don’t need Black History month – we need a refocus on how black people are part of America’s history.  Togetherness not separatist.   We don’t need a separate section in the bookstore for black writers, or black literature – isn’t this exactly the OPPOSITE of what Dr. King wanted?  Isn’t that just more segregation?  Why not count the black authors among the white – standing side by side, and shoulder to shoulder – and not given preferential treatment, or segregated treatment, but a togetherness.  A kinship.  A sense of oneness.

We need to stop outlining our differences and concentrate on what makes us the same – let’s let Barbie be Barbie, and retailers make sense of business – and leave the residue out of it.

Keith Olbermann Schooled By Dallas Tea Party

In America, Olbermann Watch, Tea Party on February 22, 2010 at 9:48 pm

(I first saw this video on Atlas Shrugs) In the video Olbermann questions: Where are they? Where are the Blacks, the Hispanics? Where are the minorities? Olbermann goes on to call out the Tea Party movement for surrounding themselves with only whites. Has Keith actually been to a Tea Party rally? He might want to consider accepting the Dallas invitation before continuing on his factually absent rants.  Good work Keith. (Oh, one last question for ya Keith: how many minorities are you surrounded by at MSNBC?)

Sheldon Whitehouse Finally Gets Noticed

In Uncategorized on December 22, 2009 at 12:29 am

Sheldon Whitehouse. There’s a household name. Recently, Sheldon Whitehouse blurted, all who oppose this health care bill are white supremacists. His carefully chosen words finally landed his name in the news. Whitehouse remarks:

And why? Why all this discord and discourtesy, all this unprecedented destructive action? All to break the momentum of our new young president.

They are desperate to break this president. They have ardent supporters who are nearly hysterical at the very election of President Barack Obama. The birthers, the fanatics, the people running around in right-wing militia and Aryan support groups, it is unbearable to them that President Barack Obama should exist. That is one powerful reason. It is not the only one.

Isn’t it interesting that Conservatives question policy, and Liberals respond with accusations of racism? It seems nearly impossible to communicate with the new, emotionally unstable Majority. What you seem to be missing Mr. Whitehouse is, the majority of Americans are dissatisfied with Congress and President Obama because of policy, not skin color.  As proud as you must be with your day in the sun, I must request your expedient return to political anonymity.